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C/n 801/2 - Test Specimen
C/n 803 - G-ARTA
C/n 804 - G-ARVA - 5N-ABD
C/n 805 - G-ARVB
C/n 806 - G-ARVC - ZA144
C/n 807 - G-ARVE
C/n 808 - G-ARVF
C/n 809 - G-ARVG - ZA141
C/n 810 - G-ARVH
C/n 811 - G-ARVI - ZA142
C/n 812 - G-ARVJ - ZD493
C/n 813 - G-ARVK - ZA143
C/n 814 - G-ARVL - ZA140
C/n 815 - G-ARVM
C/n 819 - G-ASIW - 7Q-YKH
C/n 820 - G-ASIX - A4O-AB
C/n 823 - 9G-ABO
C/n 824 - 9G-ABP
C/n 825 - G-ATDJ - XX914
C/n 826 - XR806
C/n 827 - XR807
C/n 828 - XR808
C/n 829 - XR809
C/n 830 - XR810
C/n 836 - XV106
C/n 837 - XV107
C/n 838 - XV108
C/n 839 - XV109
C/n 851 - G-ASGA - ZD230
C/n 853 - G-ASGC
C/n 863 - G-ASGM - ZD241
C/n 881 - 5X-UVA
C/n 882 - 5H-MMT - ZA147
C/n 883 - 5Y-ADA - ZA148
C/n 884 - 5X-UVJ - ZA149
C/n 885 - 5H-MOG - ZA150

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C/n 851 - G-ASGA - ZD230

Timeline

Date  
7 May 1964 First flight.
7-13 September 1964 The Super VC10 prototype featured at the Farnborough airshow, flying a spirited display in Vickers house colours.
27-29 November 1964 Flown to Khartoum, enroute to Johannesburg, for tropical trials, which were abandoned due to a severe brake failure after a demonstration flight. Returned to Wisley on or around 6th December.
31 December 1965 Delivery to BOAC as G-ASGA.
1975? Tipped onto its tail in a hangar at Johannesburg where it was having an undercarriage snag rectified. Repaired and returned to service.
March 1981 Retired from airline service, initially stored at Prestwick
3 April 1981 Sold to the RAF.
May 1981 Ferried to Abingdon for storage.
24 January 1991 Ferried to Filton with gear and slats locked down after three months of work.
13 October 1994 First flight from Filton after conversion to VC10 K4 tanker.
15 December 1994 Delivered to 101 Squadron at RAF Brize Norton as ZD230.
16th December 2005 Withdrawn from service, final flight from RAF Fairford via a flypast at Brize Norton to RAF St. Athan. Total hours on the clock: 57947 of which 4901 hours in RAF service.
April 2006 Airframe scrapped at RAF St. Athan
2012 The flightdeck was moved to a yard in North Hampshire but was finally cut up in 2012.

Photos


Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

1. The centre wing box on the left, being assembled upside down, is one of the first parts of G-ASGA. The other wing box is for a 1-11 test airframe, clearly showing the larger size of the VC10's wing.
2. In the modified fuselage jigs in the B1 building the first Super VC10 fuselage is coming together.
3. With the fuselage and wings mated, the prototype is taking shape in the final assembly building.
4. A tow truck pulls G-ASGA from the smaller of the two assembly hangars at the Weybridge factory site.


Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

1. From this angle it is clear that the Super VC10 wing as first flown on G-ASGA was still a lot like the Standard's, with squared off wing tips and full chord outboard fences.
2. Heading towards the runway for engine tests.
3. The crew for G-ASGA's first flight, from the top: Jerry Slater, Bob Bishop, Roy Mole, Bill Cairns, Brian Trubshaw.
4. Super VC10 Prototype G-ASGA taking off from Brooklands on its first flight.


Photo P. Upton

The Michael Harries Collection © The Tangmere Military Aviation Museum Trust

The Michael Harries Collection © The Tangmere Military Aviation Museum Trust

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

1. As a schoolboy Peter Upton often went to Wisley to photograph aircraft, and on such a day he took this shot of G-ASGA during testing.
2. G-ASGA landing at the 1964 Farnborough Air Show.
3. As these photos show, the Super VC10 was initially shown in Vickers colours. This photo has unfortunately suffered at the hands of time.
4. The Super VC10 prototype was one of the highlights at the Farnborough airshow in September 1964.


Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

Photo copyright BAE Systems / collection J. Hieminga

Photo M. Ungless

Photo collection J. Hieminga

1. The many photographers along the runway caught several great photos.
2. G-ASGA departing Wisley for a test flight with both the fifth engine carrying pod and an anti-spin parachute fitted. That combination might indicate stalling tests with the engine pod fitted.
3. Super VC10 G-ASGA after having come to a standstill on the runway at Khartoum with six burst tyres, putting a stop to the planned tropical trials in December 1964.
4. G-ASGA with British Airways titles over its BOAC paintscheme.


Photo S. Fitzgerald

Photo S. Fitzgerald

Photo J. Fitzherbert

Photo collection J. Hieminga

1. Parked at the maintenance base at Heathrow with an engine cover on the no.3 Conway.
2. Same parking spot but 'GA has now been repainted into the full British Airways colourscheme.
3. G-ASGA at the departure gate for an evening departure from terminal 3.
4. Another photo of G-ASGA in its British Airways colours.


Photo G. Hall

Photo G. Hall

Photo G. Hall

Photo copyright BAE Systems / Brooklands Museum Archives

1. April 1980, with not too many months left in its civil career 'GA is awaiting its passengers at Manchester.
2. Another view of the nose of the Super VC10 prototype, obviously the radome is a replacement from another airframe as the colours don't completely match up.
3. G-ASGA is heading a row of stored Super VC10s.
4. For many years the airframe was stored at Abingdon, carrying both its civil registration and RAF serial.


Photo copyright Airbus UK

Photo A. Townshend

Photo A. Townshend

Photo A. Townshend

1. After many years of standing idle, the conversion to K4 spec got underway at Filton. An overview of the 'production line' in the Brabazon Hangar.
2. 'K' seen during air-to-air refueling training in April 1998.
3. ZD230 at Gander.
4. K4 ZD230 seen iced up at Halifax, Canada in 1998, after two days of ice rain. The tanker was on its way to the USA with some Tornado F3s.


Photo R. Lee

Photo R. Lee

Photo A. Townshend

Photo Mark Little AutoAvia Photographic

1-2. As 101 Squadron was temporarily operating from Fairford, ZD230's final flight was not from Brize, but the aircraft did overfly base hangar to say goodbye to its home base.
3-4. The aircraft was dismantled at RAF St. Athan during 2006.


Photo G. Spoors / GJD Services
     

1. The cockpits of XR810 and ZD230 (right) moved to a scrapyard in Hampshire together with the flightdeck from ZD240. They were all cut up in 2012.

 

Colourschemes

Vickers /BOAC BOAC scheme of white over grey fuselage, dark-blue cheatline and fin with two white bands over fin.
Vickers 'Super VC10' scheme which was created by painting the fin overall blue and changing the BOAC titling to 'Super VC10'
BOAC First version of BOAC 'Golden Speedbird' scheme with stepped, gold-edged dark-blue cheatline. Grey lower fuselage and white upper fuselage. Dark-blue fin with gold speedbird logo.
BOAC Second version of BOAC 'Golden Speedbird' scheme, golden edge on cheatline removed and cheatline now arcs smoothly down towards the nose without the step of the previous scheme.
BOAC/BA As above but with British Airways titles on the forward fuselage.
BA First British Airways ('Negus') scheme, white over dark blue fuselage with grey wings. Top of fin and stabilizer in red with Union Jack section. British Airways titles and small Speedbird on front fuselage.
RAF First RAF 101 Sqn 'Hemp' scheme. Grey undersides with hemp colours on top and fuselage sides. Toned down markings and large letter 'K' on fin.
RAF All over grey scheme with large lightning flash down the side of the fuselage. Toned down roundels and fin flashes, code letter 'K' on fin.

 

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