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C/n 801/2 - Test Specimen
C/n 803 - G-ARTA
C/n 804 - G-ARVA - 5N-ABD
C/n 805 - G-ARVB
C/n 806 - G-ARVC - ZA144
C/n 807 - G-ARVE
C/n 808 - G-ARVF
C/n 809 - G-ARVG - ZA141
C/n 810 - G-ARVH
C/n 811 - G-ARVI - ZA142
C/n 812 - G-ARVJ - ZD493
C/n 813 - G-ARVK - ZA143
C/n 814 - G-ARVL - ZA140
C/n 815 - G-ARVM
C/n 819 - G-ASIW - 7Q-YKH
C/n 820 - G-ASIX - A4O-AB
C/n 823 - 9G-ABO
C/n 824 - 9G-ABP
C/n 825 - G-ATDJ - XX914
C/n 826 - XR806
C/n 827 - XR807
C/n 828 - XR808
C/n 829 - XR809
C/n 830 - XR810
C/n 836 - XV106
C/n 837 - XV107
C/n 838 - XV108
C/n 839 - XV109
C/n 851 - G-ASGA - ZD230
C/n 853 - G-ASGC
C/n 863 - G-ASGM - ZD241
C/n 881 - 5X-UVA
C/n 882 - 5H-MMT - ZA147
C/n 883 - 5Y-ADA - ZA148
C/n 884 - 5X-UVJ - ZA149
C/n 885 - 5H-MOG - ZA150

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C/n 819 - G-ASIW - 7Q-YKH

Timeline

Date  
29 May 1963 G-ASIW registration taken up
30 July 1964 First flight
30 September 1964 Delivery to British United Airways as G-ASIW
September 1966 Change to blue and sandstone scheme
October 1966 An incident during maintenance requires removal of the tailplane.
1970 To British Caledonian as G-ASIW 'Loch Lomond'
12 November 1974 Registered to Air Malawi as 7Q-YKH
3 December 1974 First flight in Air Malawi colours to Chileka airport, Blantyre, Malawi.
September 1979 Withdrawn from service
29 October 1979 Ferried to Hurn for possible sale to the RAF
April 1981 Crew arrives at Hurn for ferry, aircraft needs three weeks of work to get it airworthy again.
2 May 1981 Final flights: Hurn-Athens, Athens-Chileka. Stored at Chileka awaiting sale.
July 1995 Scrapped.

Photos


Photo copyright BAE SYSTEMS

Photo copyright BAE SYSTEMS

Photo copyright BAE SYSTEMS

1. BUA's first VC10, G-ASIW, being assembled at Weybridge alongside three BOAC Supers. At this point the wing still has the original wing fence configuration. This airframe had the modified wing with a 4% wing chord extension but the wing fences took some testing before they were finalised. The BUA aircraft also had downturned wingtips which were not present on BOAC machines.
2. G-ASIW on the ground at Weybridge before its first flight.
3. G-ASIW landing at Wisley on 31 July 1964, a day after its first flight.
4. The ultimate publicity photo: G-ASIW taxiing at the 1964 Farnborough airshow with a Rolls Royce visible through the open cargo door and a BUA 1-11 overhead.


Photo copyright BAE SYSTEMS

Photo copyright BAE SYSTEMS

1-2. G-ASIW seen in flight in publicity photos taken in September 1964. At this point the outboard wing fences have not been changed yet.
3. In service and awaiting passengers. This image shows that the registration was placed below the engine pylon, mostly hidden by the engines, which makes it difficult to identify individual BUA VC10s in this scheme!
4. Another photo at London Gatwick shows that the wing fence configuration hasn't been finalised. The outboard fence is cut back but there are two underwing fences which were tested on G-ASIW and the first Ghana Airways machine.


Photo A.Pollard

Photo A. Pollard

Photo J. Abington

1-2. G-ASIW in BUA's blue and sandstone livery taking off from Entebbe airport.
3. Photographed at Johannesburg in 1976.
4. The single Air Malawi VC10 seen at Chileka, Blantyre in 1977.


Photo by Caz Caswell


Photo R. Doherty


Photo J. Elder

Photo J. Elder

1. Undergoing maintenance with British Caledonian.
2. 7Q-YKH seen at Manchester after a diversion, this was not a normal stop for this airline.
3-4. After being placed in storage at Chileka the state of the airframe went downhill fast. Removal of fuel from the tanks caused the centre of gravity to shift, add some high winds and the VC10 adopted this undignified pose.

 


Photo J. Elder

 

   

1. When the president was due to use the airport the VC10 had to be put back on its gear. The solution was to remove two of the engines, this tipped the aircraft back on its nosewheel.

Colourschemes

BUA Dark blue and red over white with large Union Jack on fin.
BUA Blue and sandstone scheme, white over grey fuselage with large blue/sandstone cheatline sweeping up over the fin. Text on engine nacelles was later removed to match the 1-11 scheme.
BCal Initially titled as 'Caledonian//BUA', white over grey fuselage with dark blue and gold cheatline, dark blue fin with lion rampant. Known as 'Golden Lion' scheme. Titles later changed to 'British Caledonian'. All aircraft were named after Scottish lochs.
AM White topped fuselage to below window belt line. Black, red and green cheatline. Red titles on forward fuselage, red tailfin with logo.

 

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